Technosonics XV: Found Sound

Concert I: Sounds in the Making: Featuring Guest Composer Joo Won Park
November 6, 2014 – 8:00 pm
Livestreamed from Open Grounds
Livestreamed

Joo Won ParkThe University of Virginia McIntire Department of Music and the Virginia Center for Computer Music present TechnoSonics XV: Found Sound on Thursday November 6 2014.  TechnoSonics is an annual themed festival that showcases digital music and intermedia and brings high profile outside performers and composers to collaborate with UVA composers and faculty performers. TechnoSonics XV: Found Sound is supported by the Office of the Provost & the Vice Provost for the Arts.

For our fifteenth annual TechnoSonics Festival, we focus on the role of “found sound” in new media. This combines the use of humble everyday materials and environmental sounds with technological processing,  multimedia and live performance interactions. Found sound as a musical resource has a long history, from the early twentieth century, when it was used by composers such as Eric Satie, Arthur Honegger, and George Antheil, whose Ballet Mécanique  included three airplane propellers and seven electric bell! John Cage used all kinds of found sounds in his work, ranging from radio frequencies to a cactus. As digital transformation of sound became possible, a host of composers have created compelling music using the sounds of everyday objects.

This concert kicks off the two-day festival and features the music of outstanding UVa emerging composers as well as music by Joo Won Park and other major composers who draw on found sound. There will be a pre-concert panel discussing the music immediately prior to the performance at 7:30 p.m.  Thursday evening events will be livestreamed from Open Grounds. Please check back for the link.

Reviews for Joo Won Park:

“In the hands of Philadelphia-based Joo Won Park, the no-input mixer is less a matter of singing than full-on, tantrum-level glossolalia, a heavy gurgle of electric fissues. Up above is Park’s October 1402 (for no-input mixer and computer), which at times sounds like an arcade game on its last legs, and at others like freakazoid hardcore free jazz improvisation.”- Disquiet, October 2013 

“Joo Won Park is a rising star among modern composers. He produces music by recording everyday sounds as well as some more unusual ones and designing his own instruments from these sounds, using specialized programs to process the sounds via computer. Some of the programs are so specialized, in fact, that he codes them himself, line by line. It is a painstaking process, but one that yields spectacular results.”- Pathways Magazine, Oct 2010

“Both in terms of malipulating sound, and simply using sound, Joo Won Park is fantastically talented, and it is apparent in every second, with every subtle change, with every click and swirl of this piece. With each phase, each time one texture moves into the next, one is certain that it could have occurred in no other way. Beautiful.” - Asymmetry Magazine, April 2010 

PROGRAM AND PERFORMERS SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

An Arts Enhancement Event supported by the Office of the Provost & the Vice Provost for the Arts.

Technosonics XV: Found Sound

Concert II: Sounds Around: Featuring Guest Composer Annie Gosfield
November 7, 2014 – 8:00 pm
Old Cabell Hall
Free – An Arts Enhancement Event

Annie GosfieldThe University of Virginia McIntire Department of Music and the Virginia Center for Computer Music present TechnoSonics XV: Found Sound on Friday November 7 2014 in Old Cabell Hall.  TechnoSonics is an annual themed festival that showcases digital music and intermedia and brings high profile outside performers and composers to collaborate with UVA composers and faculty performers. TechnoSonics XV: Found Sound is supported by the Office of the Provost & the Vice Provost for the Arts.

For our fifteenth annual TechnoSonics Festival, we focus on the role of “found sound” in electroacoustic music. This combines the use of humble everyday materials and environmental sounds with technological processing, and involves multimedia as well as purely musical performance. Found sound as a musical resource has a long history, from the early twentieth century, when it was used by composers such as Eric Satie, Arthur Honegger, and George Antheil, whose Ballet Mécanique had instruments including three airplane propellers and seven electric bells. John Cage used all kinds of found sounds in his work, ranging from radio frequencies to a cactus. As digital transformation of sound became possible, a host of composers have created compelling music using the sounds of everyday obejects.

This concert, the cornerstone of the two day festival,  features not only the works of UVA faculty and guest composers, but also works from important representatives of the wider compositional community. The festival will also incorporate a second concert featuring music by our outstanding graduate student composers, interleaved with music by our visitors and other composers whose practice is informed by the use of found sound.

Our special guests for this concert include internationally acclaimed composer Annie Gosfield  who will perform her own work.

Press for Annie Gosfield:
“…a major figure of the downtown scene with pieces that use nonmusical sounds (warped records, satellite signals, and more) in a strikingly expressive manner” (The New Yorker)

“An emotional highlight was Annie Gosfield’s ‘Long Waves and Random Pulse’ for violin and jammed radio signals… The sound palette created by these multiple layers was astonishingly rich, and at times the virtuosic violin line above the repetitive radio signal patterns took on the tried and-tested beauty of a Vivaldi concerto.” (The NY Times)

Garrett Mendelow, an American percussionist based in Germany will perform Matthew Burtner’s EcoTones for solo percussion and interactive electronics, as well as composer and shakucahi artist Kojiro Umezaki of Yo Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble, who will present music by Ted Coffey. Our own excellent UVA faculty performers will also perform.

Old Cabell Hall is located on the south end of UVA’s historic lawn, directly opposite the Rotunda.  (map) Parking is available in the central grounds parking garage on Emmet Street, in the C1 parking lot off McCormick Rd, and in the parking lots at the UVA Corner.  Handicap parking is available in the small parking lot adjacent to Bryan Hall.

PROGRAM AND PERFORMERS SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

An Arts Enhancement Event supported by the Office of the Provost & the Vice Provost for the Arts.


Carla Scaletti Colloquium

The McIntire Department of Music presents a colloquium by Carla Scaletti on Friday, October 31st, 2014 at 3:30pm in 107 Old Cabell Hall.  This event is free and open to the public.

Composer/entrepreneur Carla Scaletti is the designer of the Kyma sound design language and co-founder of Symbolic Sound Corporation.

Her music is experimental, always starting from a “what-if” hypothesis, and invariably involves live electronics (Kyma) interacting with acoustic sources and environments.

Educated at the University of Illinois (DMA, MCS), she studied composition with Salvatore Martirano, John Melby, Herbert Brün and Scott Wyatt, and she studied computer science with Ralph Johnson, one of the Design Patterns “Gang of Four”.

She was, for several years, an invited lecturer at Centre de Crèation Musical Iannis Xenakis (CCMIX) in Paris, and each year she co-organizes the Kyma International Sound Symposium (KISS)—a conclave of Kyma practitioners exploring a special theme through words, workshops, and music.  KISS2014 was 25-28 September in Lübeck Germany and centered on the theme: “Organic Sound”.

In addition to her work in software development and music composition, she has a special interest in scientific data sonification, and some of her work with physicist Lily Asquith on data from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has found its way into a score for Gilles Jobin’s QUANTUM, a physics-inspired dance piece whose North American premiere was at Brooklyn Academy of Music on October 2, 2014.

Carla Scaletti website: http://www.carlascaletti.com/

Carla Scaletti will give a colloquium on October 31st 2014, 3:30pm in 107 Old Cabell Hall :
Data-driven Sound: What scientific data sonification has taught me about music

Over the course of the past 25 years, I’ve been working with scientists to turn their data into sound for the purposes of understanding and communicating their results.  Not only has this changed the way I think about mapping, data, and sound synthesis, it has, unexpectedly, also changed the way I think about music.
Scientific data sonification is a mapping of data from an experiment or a model to one or more parameters of a sound synthesis algorithm for the purpose of interpreting, understanding or communicating the results of the experiment or the model.  This talk will focus on a recent collaboration with CERN physicist Lily Asquith on LHC data and the search for the Higgs boson and how this project influenced the music I created for choreographer Gilles Jobin’s piece QUANTUM.

Old Cabell Hall is located on the south end of UVA’s historic lawn, directly opposite the Rotunda.  (map)  Parking is available in the central grounds parking garage on Emmet Street, and in the parking lots at the UVA Corner.


Room availability for the VCCM lab (room B011 Old Cabell Hall): VCCM Lab Schedule
Please email any problems or issues to tthatcher@virginia.edu.

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